A Diary In America, With Remarks On Its Institutions. Part Second Frederick Marryat

ISBN: 9780217664394

Published: January 10th 2012

Paperback

152 pages


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A Diary In America, With Remarks On Its Institutions. Part Second  by  Frederick Marryat

A Diary In America, With Remarks On Its Institutions. Part Second by Frederick Marryat
January 10th 2012 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, RTF | 152 pages | ISBN: 9780217664394 | 6.72 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1839. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... I advances, in consequence of theirMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher.

1839. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... I advances, in consequence of their surrendering all title to the rest of the Florida country, and engaging to confine themselves to the limits of the territory allotted to them. Nothing could be more plain or simple than the terms of this treaty, which, in consequence of the council being held at this spot, was denominated the treaty of Camp Moultrie. The third article in the treaty of Camp Moultrie runs as follows: -- The United States will take the Florida Indians under their care and patronage, and will afford them protection against all persons whatsoever.

One of the great errors committed by the American Government was in binding itself to perform what was not in its power. It could no more protect these Indians against the white marauders than it could prevent the insurgents from attacking Upper Canada. The arm of the Federal Government is too weak to reach its owa confines, as will hereafter be shewn by its own acknowledgment.

The consequence was that, very soon after the treaty of Camp Moultrie had been signed, the Indians were robbed and plundered by the miscreants who hovered near them for that purpose. An American author states that two men, Robinson and Wilburn, belonging to Georgia, contrived to steal from one chief twenty slaves, to the value of 15,000 dollars, and carried them to New Orleans. I will however quote a portion of the work. Another influential chief, Emachitochustern, commonly called John Walker, was robbed of a number of slaves in a somewhat similar manner. After making an appeal to the government agent, without the least chance of redress, he says: -- I dont like to make any trouble or to have any quarrel with white people, but, if they will trespass on my lands and rights, I must defend myself the best way I can, and if they do...



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